FAQ

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ORSI Frequently Asked Question

Frequency Coordination Issues and Answers

  • What is a Shared non-protected pair?
  • It was asked about using 145.25 for a network of repeater for disaster work, so one would never be out of range of one.
  • How or who do we work with in the surrounding states?
  • What if someone puts up a repeater in one of the surrounding states that interferes with my repeater?
  • What if the trustee of that repeater says he is coordinated, but it is through a coordination group that we don’t know or recognize?
  • So what about the mess in Texas? What is ORSI doing about it?
  • What is the biggest problem we have here in Oklahoma?
  • Speaking of that, “I want a repeater pair for my area; you say there are no pairs available. You guys have one listed, but I have not heard it on the air for a long time. What’s the deal?

What is the biggest problem we have here in Oklahoma?

  1. Not knowing what’s really on the air and what isn’t. Our district officers will be working on this problem over the next few months.

What if the repeater system in question was coordinated by some “alternate” group that seemingly sprung up out of nowhere?

  1. Yes that happens, and Texas is not the only place where it happens. We had that occur several years ago here in Oklahoma.

If all this is voluntary how can the FCC enforce that?

  1. In part 97, the FCC’s rules and regulations concerning amateur radio, the FCC has a rule that states that an amateur station must be operated at all times using “good operating and engineering practices.” Therefore abiding by a recognized band plan is good operating practice. Getting your repeater coordinated is good operating practice. By not doing these things they (FCC) consider it “not good operating practice” and therefore it is a violation of Part 97.

What if the trustee of that repeater says he is coordinated, but it is through a coordination group that we don’t know or recognize?

  1. Therein lays the problem, the FCC’s definition of who a coordinator is rather loose. In fact the FCC even says that the whole coordination process is voluntary (to an extent).

    A coordination body is whoever a majority of hams in a given area recognizes to be the coordinator (again this is the FCC’s policy).

    Now some trustees then take an attitude that they can do what they want to, and stick a repeater up on any frequency they want, anywhere they want and they are within their rights.

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